Walking to the Train
The concept for the Lillydale mural as a working title is called "Walking to the Train". This reflects the daily commuter activity in which people park their cars before walking to catch the train. The main subject of lillies, which as a reference to Lillydale is almost too obvious, however their presentation in a stylised surrealistic manner, offers a provocation to consider the town in a new way. Patterns on the lillies will be drawn from patterns found in the town such as; patterns on one of the dresses worn by Dame Melba, or tiles found on a pub, or the pattern on the trains, or a first nations design (if possible). One pattern featured below is from a ceiling in the Athenaeum Theatre which was designed by Walter Burley-Griffen. This patterning device will enable input from members of the community while maintaining coherence in the design.  
The work will be rendered via large format printing onto a vinyl substrate that is used in commercial situations.
* Note: all images except for Calling the Harlequin are sketches and are not intended to directly represent the final work.
Full work sketch
Full work sketch
Ancillary work sketch 1
Ancillary work sketch 1
Ancillary work sketch2
Ancillary work sketch2
Ancillary work sketch3
Ancillary work sketch3
Calling the Harlequin
Calling the Harlequin
Development sketch - patterns
Development sketch - patterns
Development sketch
Development sketch
Initial Sketch
Initial Sketch
The ceiling of the Athenaeum Theatre Lillydale
The ceiling of the Athenaeum Theatre Lillydale
Detail of a stage costume of Dame Melba
Detail of a stage costume of Dame Melba
The current 3D model
The current 3D model
Style
The style of Walking to the Train is a kind of photo-real surrealism that draws on past works including "Calling the Harlequin" which is shown above. This work depicts a machine that is in a flooded world. Its purpose is to make music with a giant clarinet in order to summon the Harlequin into existence. The work makes reference to Stockhausen's work for clarinet "Harliken". In a similar vein, the dream-like style in Walking to the Train is intended to provoke a state of mind in which reflective speculation about Lillydale is stimulated. Questions can be prompted such as: Its Lillydale a place that we can dream about? Can the past and the future be joined through our dreaming? Are there hidden things both positive and negative that we might need to bring to the surface?
Working Process
The images presented here are made using 3D modelling software (Blender). The elements of the picture are made with mesh geometry that are cloaked with surfaces and lit in a virtual 3D environment. The final image is calculated from the position of a virtual camera. This affords the production of multiple images from different camera positions. It is therefore possible to create an exhibition of ancillary images in support of the mural.
Community Engagement
The design of the concept has taken into account the feedback provided by council through the community engagement process. In response the concept is framed via the dream reference to enable a wide range of elements. As mentioned above, patterns or symbols significant to Lillydale have been provided for. In future development of the work there is space of other elements such as a possible reference to the regular flooding that Lillydale was subject to. This flooding of course now has resonance with current concerns for the effects of global warming. 
Other community engagement currently undertaken includes: an Historical Tour of Lillydale with the Lillydale Historical Society and a meeting with Megan Sheehy and Gretel Taylor from the Yarra Ranges Regional Museum. 
During the development process further consultation will be undertaken. In particular consultation with First Nations People including the curator Stacey Piper will be undertaken.
Installation
The work will be installed professionally by a company such as Mesh Direct https://www.meshdirect.com.au who have significant resources and experience in creating large scale printed works for architectural projects. In recent discussions with them I have received assurance that the printing and installation are feasible for the proposed site and within the the budget.